Tag Archives: New York Times

The New York Times Discovers Bone Broth

Egg drop soup made with organic grass-fed beef bone broth and organic local eggs.
Egg drop soup made with organic grass-fed beef bone broth and organic, local duck eggs.

The New York Times has discovered the wonders of bone broth, which is taking Manhattan restaurants by storm.

Here at Good to Go, we say, welcome to the party! Robin discovered bone broth years ago, when our friend Sonia Sola of Nectar Hills Farm told Robin to watch a scientist’s video about it on You Tube (there are many you can easily find with a search).

From the NY Times article:

“When you talk to chefs about this, everyone’s head is exploding,” said the chef Marco Canora, who has just opened Brodo, a storefront window in the East Village attached to his restaurant, Hearth, where three different flavorful broths are dispensed in paper cups. Like an espresso drink, the broths at Brodo can be customized, with add-ins like grated fresh turmeric, house-made chile oil and bone marrow from grass-fed cattle, which transforms plainly delicious broth into a richly satisfying snack.

Robin’s specialty is beef bone broth made with organic, grass-fed beef or lamb. It’s much more than just boiled bones. She has perfected an entire process that results in a creamy, meaty, delicious broth into which she can add the vegetables, mushrooms, or eggs of your choice!

How cool is that? Order a cup of bone broth and drink it while you stand at our little counter–or, the “bone broth bar.”

And, of course, we can put it in a to-go cup! Now that’s Good to Go!

The Next Great Thing

Grass-fed bologna grilled extra aged cheddar cheese sandwich
Grass-fed bologna and grilled (extra aged cheddar) cheese sandwich

Good News, Everyone!

The very thing I am aiming to do with Good To Go in Cherry Valley is, according to today’s New York Times, wildly successful. The Next Great Thing, and it’s just around the corner, friends.

From the New York Times story:

After decades of public hand-wringing about the empty calories and environmental impact of fast food, the farm-to-table notions that have revolutionized higher-end American restaurants have finally found a lucrative spot in the takeout line. The result already has a nickname: farm to counter.

“This is not a passing fad,” said B. Hudson Riehle, the research director for the National Restaurant Association, who added that locally grown food and sustainability were the top two customer priorities reported this year in the group’s annual poll of American chefs. “It’s only going to get stronger.”

Get involved!